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Subjects: History


Learning Tool
TitleSourceDescription
Abolition and Antislavery TimelineEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveThis illustrated timeline tracks events in the history of abolitionism from the 1820s to the 1860s. From Abolitionism and Antislavery, the fourth in Professor Eric Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
Advanced Papyrological Information SystemLibraryWeb / Department of ClassicsAPIS is a multi-institutional project to create a digital library of documentary papyri and ostraka in U.S. collections; currently contains over 16,000 high-quality digital images.
A History of Looking at Muslims as Violent PeopleRichard Bulliet/Columbia InteractiveThis audio slide show demonstrates that the United States has had mostly-forgotten military conflicts with Muslim peoples in the past, which might have contributed to a notion of Muslims as "violent people." The slide show is taken from the e-seminar "Battles and Bibles:1776-1913," the first in a multi-part series of e-seminars taught by Richard W. Bulliet on America and the Muslim World.
An American Physician in Saudi ArabiaRichard Bulliet/Columbia InteractivePhotos from the personal collection of Dr. Louis Dame, an American physician who was in Saudi Arabia from 1919–1936, working on behalf of the Reformed Church of America. From the e-seminar Battles and Bibles: 1776–1913, with Richard W. Bulliet.
A Political History of PakistanPhilip Oldenburg/Columbia InteractiveThis timeline highlights key moments in the political history of Pakistan, paying particular attention to whether or not events have contributed towards the creation of a democratic or an authoritarian government.
A Reason to ArmPhilip Oldenburg/Columbia InteractiveThis animated map with narration explains why the new government of Pakistan felt itself threatened by outside powers.
Change is Constant in New YorkKenneth T. Jackson / Columbia InteractiveIn this multimedia excerpt, Professor Kenneth T. Jackson discusses a key theme in New York City's history: change is constant. The slide show is taken from History as Destiny: The Case of New York City, the opening e-seminar in a series of classes based on Professor Jackson's legendary course on the history of New York City, which he has taught for over thirty years.
Columbia '68Barnard Electronic Archive and Teaching LaboratoryColumbia '68 is one of six interactive histories of select periods of Columbia University now under development.
Columbia American History Online (CAHO)
CAHO features a growing collection of resources designed for students and teachers of American history. It includes 17 e-seminars taught by world-renowned Columbia University professors.
Columbia E-Guide: Archives and Manuscript CollectionsLibraryWebA selective guide to archives and manuscript collections in national libraries, state archives and libraries, college and university collections, and historical society archives. Prepared and maintained by CU Library staff.
Columbia University Interactive Tour
Columbia Automated Vision EnvironmentThis interactive tour was created using 360-degree imaging technology developed in Columbia's Computer Vision Laboratory (CAVE). Navigate around the campus and immerse yourself in the history of Columbia's beautiful buildings.
Digital Scriptorium: A Prototype Image Database & Visual Union Catalog Of Medieval And Renaissance ManuscriptsHosted by UC BerkeleyDigital Scriptorium is a searchable image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts intended as a resource for teaching and scholarly research by paleographers, codicologists, art historians, textual scholars and other researchers. Developed initially by Columbia and Berkeley, it now contains over 8000 images and will soon expand to include material from twelve additional partner institutions.
Early Columbia College 1784-1856: An Interactive HistoryBarnard Electronic Archive and Teaching LaboratoryAn array of interactive materials relating to the early history of Columbia College.
Emancipation in the NorthEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveThis interactive map shows the slow progress of emancipation even in the Northern states. During the period between 1777 and 1804 all of the Northern states passed emancipation laws, but the majority of them were "gradual," promising freedom only to slaves not yet born, at some future date. The map is taken from The Struggle for Freedom, the second e-seminar of the Slavery and Emancipation series, with Professor Eric Foner.
Epistolae: Medieval Women's Latin LettersColumbia Center for New Media Teaching and LearningAn online repository for 1,500 letters written by or to women between 400 and 1300 A.D., this database includes full search capabilities and an interface conducive to study, scholarship and presentation.
Gateway to Cancer Alley
David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveThis photographic essay depicts a series of plants lined up along the Mississippi River in a region that became known as "Cancer Alley."
Geography of SlaveryEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveView the changing status of slavery in the United States from 1783-1861 with this vivid interactive map. Excerpted from Abolitionism and Antislavery, the fourth in Professor Eric Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
Great CitiesKenneth T. Jackson / Columbia InteractiveLearn why other great cities did not flourish as New York did by taking this brief quiz from Kenneth T. Jackson's e-seminar History as Destiny: The Case of New York City.
Growth and Decline of SlaveryEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveThis interactive map shows how slave populations changed in the individual states during the period 1790–1860. In the Northern states, which had passed gradual emancipation laws, the slave population dwindled and eventually disappeared. But in the Southern states it continued to rise. The map is taken from The Struggle for Freedom, the second e-seminar of the Slavery and Emancipation series, with Professor Eric Foner.
Harlem History
Columbia C250Harlem History presents a wealth of archival treasures and scholarship from Columbia about the history of one of the world's most famous and influential neighborhoods.
Key Events Marking the Development of American Relations with the Muslim World: 1786-1913Richard Bulliet/Columbia InteractiveThis timeline of key events in the development of American relations with the Muslim world during the years 1786–1913 contains extensive maps, photographs and reproductions of archival documents. It is taken from the e-seminar Battles and Bibles: 1776–1913, the first in a multi-part series of e-seminars taught by Richard W. Bulliet which examine the history of America and its relation to the Muslim world.
King's College 1754-1776: An Interactive HistoryBarnard Electronic Archive and Teaching LaboratoryThis site offers an interactive rendering of the short history of Columbia University's beginnings as "King's College in the Province of New York."
Letter from Dr. Rex Wilson Regarding AcroosteolysisDavid Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveLetter from B. F. Goodrich physician Rex Wilson to a colleague, regarding acroosteolysis in factory workers (November 12, 1964).
Letter from Mrs. Emmers to President Franklin RooseveltDavid Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveIn her letter to President Franklin Roosevelt, Mrs. Emmers (pseudonym) describes how lead poisoning ruined the health of her daughter and her husband (1933).
Mapping the Middle EastGary Sick/Columbia InteractiveThis extraordinary resource, accompanying Professor Gary Sick's seminar on Islam, revolution and the modern state of Iran, allows viewers to highlight key areas of the Middle East for information about leadership, suffrage and religious make-up. Also included are a quiz and secondary maps about Muslim populations throughout the world by number, percent-of-population, and Shi'a/Sunni breakdown.
New York in RevolutionKenneth T. Jackson / Columbia InteractiveKenneth T. Jackson narrates this animation of the movement of British and Colonial troops around New York City during the Revolutionary War. From the e-seminar Colonial City; Revolutionary Battleground.
Phlamoudhi-Melissa: A Middle to Late Bronze Age Settlement on CyprusMedia Center for Art History, Archaeology, and Historic PreservationPhlamoudhi (probably named after flower of the lime tree) is a village on the north coast of Cyprus. Learn about Columbia excavations there and in Melissa, a contemporary site of the late Middle through Late Bronze Ages (ca. 1700-1200 B.C.). Downloadable PDF report available, and information on becoming a lab volunteeer.
Photo Essay: Roberts CollegeRichard Bulliet/Columbia InteractiveThis photo essay presents images from the history of Robert College, which was established primarily as a missionary establishment in Istanbul in 1863. Eventually it was taken over by the Turkish government and became "Bosphorus University." From the e-seminar Battles and Bibles: 1776–1913, with Richard W. Bulliet.
Plantation Values: The Harsher RealityEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveIn this audio slideshow, Professor Eric Foner examines an advertisement of slaves for sale and demonstrates that the reality of slavery was far more harsh than the paternalist vision would lead one to believe. The audio slideshow is taken from The Old South, the third in Professor Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
Plastics in the KitchenDavid Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveThe wonders of household plastics are revealed in this DuPont industrial film set in "Plasticstown" (1950s).
Poles TogetherColumbia Center for New Media Teaching and LearningFollow the journeys of polar explorers Nansen, Shackleton, Scott and Amundsen by examining journals kept by the exploration teams, images, and other resources. Using a custom, CIESIN-designed, GIS map tool, students access recent data from the poles to compare the conditions the explorers encountered with current trends. They also perform role-play exercises that put them in charge of a virtual expedition.
Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund BurkeColumbia Center for New Media Teaching and LearningA primary reading in Columbia's Core Curriculum, this text is enhanced by the inclusion of glossaries of concepts and people, author's notes and links to reference materials, such as the online version of the Oxford English Dictionary and the Grove Dictionary of Art. Columbia network connection required.
Slave Life and Culture: Field Workers' ConditionsEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveIn this audio slideshow, Professor Eric Foner narrates how the conditions of life for slaves who worked in the fields varied according to the kind of plantation or farm they lived on and the crop they were working. The audio slideshow is taken from The Old South, the third in Professor Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
Slavery and the Sugar TradeEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveThe sugar crop was central in the triangular international trade that entailed the shipping of manufactured goods from England to Africa and slaves from Africa to the New World. This audio slide show is excerpted from the e-seminar Slavery and Emancipation: The Origins of Slavery in the New World, taught by Eric Foner.
The Amheida Excavation, Dakhleh Oasis, EgyptMedia Center for Art History, Archaeology, and Historic PreservationColumbia's excavation at Amheida, Egypt, is a unique multidisciplinary project that innovatively links the sciences and humanities. The participants include the departments of Anthropology, Classics, Art History and Archaeology, the Graduate School of Architecture, Preservation and Planning, Computer Science, the Media Center for Art History, Archaeology, and Historic Preservation, the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, and Biosphere.
The Cotton Kingdom: The Spread of SlaveryEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveThis animated map illustrates the rapid spread of slavery throughout the South in the nineteenth century, as it crossed the Mississippi River into Texas and Arkansas and began to concentrate in the richest cotton growing regions. Professor Eric Foner's narrates how an internal slave trade developed to supply slaves to the expanding Cotton Kingdom of the Deep South. The map is taken from The Old South, the third in Professor Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
The Dutch Boy Conquers Old Man Gloom: A Paint Book for Boys and GirlsDavid Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveAs part of its "cater to the children" campaign, the National Lead Company produced coloring books with stories about the adventures of the Dutch Boy. In this 1929 booklet, narrated by Gerald Markowitz, the Dutch Boy takes on Old Man Gloom.
The Manufacture of PVCDavid Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveThis Flash animation shows how basic elements such as oil, salt, and water undergo a series of transformations and recombinations to become PVC.
The Midnight's Children Multimedia Study Environment
Columbia Center for New Media and Teaching (CCNMTL)The Midnight's Children Multimedia Study Environment, produced by the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, provides students the opportunity to gain a richer understanding of Salman Rushdie's acclaimed novel, the play derived from it, and the historical and cultural context in which the story is set.
The Rise of Abolition: Women and African-AmericansEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveIn this video slideshow, Professor Eric Foner points out that both women and African-Americans played major parts in the abolitionist movement. Some women abolitionists spoke out publicly in ways that were unusual for women at the time. Free blacks and fugitive slaves such as Frederick Douglass became important supporters and speakers. From Abolitionism and Antislavery, the fourth in Professor Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
The Road to War: John Brown's RaidEric Foner/Columbia InteractiveGrowing tensions between North and South were further heightened in 1859, when abolitionist John Brown led an armed assault at Harper's Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia) hoping to spark off a slave insurrection. This audio slideshow is excerpted from Abolitionism and Antislavery, the fourth in Professor Eric Foner's series of e-seminars Slavery and Emancipation.
The Seneca Village WebsiteInstitute for Learning TechnologySeneca Village was Manhattan's first community of African American property owners. Explore this site and learn about the history of Africans in New York City as well as the history of the city itself. Appropriate for grade school through high school students and their teachers.
Timeline: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Great SocietyAlan Brinkley/Columbia InteractiveThis interactive timeline illuminates presidential politics and social change in the U.S. from 1952-1965, using archival images and video. From Kennedy, Johnson, and the Great Society, the fifth in Professor Alan Brinkley's series of e-seminars America Since 1945.
Timeline: PVC, Industry, and Health
David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz/Columbia InteractiveThis timeline tracks the key events in the relationship between the development of PVC and industry promotion of plastics at the expense of public health.

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