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E-Seminars: Journalism


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The following state-of-the-art learning experiences were developed at Columbia University by distinguished faculty members working closely with our skilled instructional technology staff. Three to five hours in length, these in-depth multimedia e-seminars are free to Columbia students, faculty, and staff.

TitleSourceDescription
Art and Politics: Cultural Criticism in a Democracy—E-Seminar 1, The Origins of Modern Criticism
Columbia Learning Experiences
Michael JanewayThe Origins of Modern Criticism is the first of two e-seminars drawn from Michael Janeway's popular course offered jointly by Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and School of the Arts. Cultural criticism—ranging from reviews of the latest film, book, or concert to the broadest kind of reporting and commentary on cultural issues—is a feature of democratic culture that we take almost for granted. For the past century and a half, in England and America, vital debates about our cultural and political health have been carried forward within this complex arena.

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War Reporting—A Series of Three E-Seminars
Columbia Learning Experiences
Tom LansnerIn War Reporting, a series of three e-seminars, Professor Tom Lansner, a former war correspondent, covers a broad swath of battlefield journalism, from Julius Caesar to contemporary reporting of the 2003 American invasion of Iraq.

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War Reporting—E-Seminar 1, Romance and Reality
Columbia Learning Experiences
Tom LansnerIn this first e-seminar in the three-part series War Reporting, Professor Tom Lansner, a former war correspondent for the British press, covers the colorful history of battlefield journalism, from Julius Caesar to the recent conflict in Afghanistan. While outlining the evolution of war reporting, Professor Lansner discusses shifts in the profession over the last century, including the increase of women reporting from the frontlines, the increased attention to the ethics of war and war reporting, and the role of editorial "gatekeepers" who determine which wars and reports make the news.

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War Reporting—E-Seminar 2, Media and Propaganda
Columbia Learning Experiences
Tom LansnerIn Media and Propaganda, the second e-seminar in the three-part series War Reporting, Professor Tom Lansner, a former foreign-war correspondent, looks at the development of propaganda and of government restrictions on journalists during U.S. wars of the past 150 years.

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War Reporting—E-Seminar 3, Technologies and Responsibilities
Columbia Learning Experiences
Tom LansnerIn Technologies and Responsibilities, the third e-seminar in the three-part series War Reporting, Professor Tom Lansner, a former war correspondent, looks at the impact of lighter, faster, and more powerful digital communication tools on reporting from the battlefield, including how the increasing volume of coverage is often provided without the context and analysis needed to understand it.

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Covering Terrorism—A Series of Two E-Seminars
Columbia Learning Experiences
Brigitte L. NacosIn her two-part e-seminar series, Covering Terrorism, Brigitte Nacos, associate professor of political science at Columbia University, examines the marriage of convenience that exists between terrorists and the media in the light of 9/11.

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Covering Terrorism—E-Seminar 1, The Media and 9/11
Columbia Learning Experiences
Brigitte L. NacosIn the first e-seminar in her two-part e-seminar series, political science professor Brigitte Nacos examines the marriage of convenience that exists between terrorists and the media. In this seminar, Professor Nacos focuses specifically on how the media's coverage shaped the events of September 11 and what unfolded after the attacks occurred.

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Covering Terrorism—E-Seminar 2, How the Media and Terrorism Shape Public Understanding
Columbia Learning Experiences
Brigitte L. NacosIn this second e-seminar in her two-part series, political science professor Brigitte Nacos examines how the tangled relationship between terrorists and the media has helped to create today's more lethal form of terrorism. Using recent examples of terrorism such as the Oklahoma City bombing, Professor Nacos raises questions about defining terrorists and terrorism, the influence of the end of the Cold War on international terrorism, media responsibility for terrorist acts, and other related topics.

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Journalism in the Digital Age
Columbia Learning Experiences
John PavlikThis e-seminar by John Pavlik leads you through the myriad ways in which digital technologies have had a impact on the practice of journalism, from the way reporters gather information and present news stories to how news organizations structure themselves and do business. Discussing technologies now in use and on the horizon, Professor Pavlik provides an overview of the changes and challenges the digital age has brought to the purveyors and the consumers of the news.

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News Reporting Simulation: A Fire Scenario
Columbia Learning Experiences
John Pavlik and Melvin MencherA five-alarm fire rages late at night in a high-rise apartment in Freeport, a medium-sized city in the Midwest. On the police beat, you hear the report on the police scanner. Your assignment in this online learning experience is to cover the fire for The Freeport News within a two-hour deadline.

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