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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



 
Small Wonders: The World of Nano-Science
Taught by: Horst Stormer

Description
E-Seminar Description
The nanoscale, just above the scale of an atom, is the place where the properties of most common things are determined. It is here that the disciplines of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering meet and conspire. In this e-seminar, Professor Horst Stormer magnifies the wondrous nano-world and reveals its enormous potential to shape our future. Stormer illuminates not only the often bizarre physics of the nanoscale but also explores cutting-edge nano-science research. From smart molecules that display incredible powers of self-assembly to fields of carbon nanotubes growing like grass, from transistors only several atoms wide to tweezers composed of DNA, the world of nano-science never ceases to astonish and amaze.
E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
All Registrants:FREE
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E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    To understand the basic concepts and principles of nano-science.

•    To explore how nano-science is shaping the development of new technology.

•    To propose future avenues of nano-science research.

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Outline
1. What is Nano?
2. Visualizing the Nanoscale
3. Building Complexity from Atoms
4. Convergence at the Nanoscale
5. Transistors
6. Nanoscale Transistors
7. Nano Communications
8. Physics at the Nanoscale
9. Growing Carbon Nanotubes
10. Nanotubes in Transistors
11. Touching an Atom
12. Smart Molecules
13. Molecular Motors
14. The Future of Nano

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Horst Stormer joined the physics faculty of Columbia University in 1998, the same year he won the Nobel Prize for Physics, after working for twenty years in the research area of Bell Labs. His area of expertise is in condensed-matter physics with an emphasis on semiconductors. In particular, his research focuses on the physics of two-dimensional, one-dimensional, and zero-dimensional systems. In these structures, electrons are quantum-mechanically bound to a plane, a line, or a small dot. At very low temperatures (about 1 K and below), these quantum structures exhibit bizarre new properties.

For a complete autobiography of Professor Stormer, visit the Nobel Prize site.

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Recommended Reading
None. The site for this lecture includes a list of recommended Web sites and articles.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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