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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
How Your Brain Works—Or Not!
Taught by: Darcy B. Kelley

Description
E-Seminar Description
A typical human brain is about six and half inches long and four inches tall. Into this organ are packed something like a hundred billion nerve cells. The way that these neurons connect to each other and how they behave when they are active and not active determines pretty much everything about human behavior: how we see the world, how we move, how we think, whether we are hungry, happy, or sad. Our brains even determine the most subtle aspects of our personality, such as exuberance, timidity, optimism, or pessimism. How your brain works, and some of the ways in which it might not be working so well, are the subjects of this lecture by Darcy Kelley, Professor of Biological Sciences. Professor Kelley has recently been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor—Columbia's first—and will receive a million-dollar grant for an initiative to involve undergraduates in cutting-edge scientific research.

E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
All Registrants:FREE
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E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    To be able to navigate the major features and cell types in the brain.

•    To consider how sensory language signals reach and are processed by the brain.

•    To describe methods for studying brain function and for approaching complex neurological questions.

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Outline
1. Introduction
2. Brain Navigation
3. Cerebral Cortex
4. Brains in Action
5. Loss of Language
6. Diagnosing Aphasia
7. Glial Cells
8. Kinds of Neurons
9. Nerve Cell Signals
10. Brain Function
11. Hearing Anatomy
12. Processing Language
13. Signing Chimps
14. Talking Parrots
15. Singing Frogs
16. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Darcy B. Kelley is Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. She is the editor of the Journal of Neurobiology and a codirector of Columbia's doctoral subcommittee on neurobiology and behavior. Her laboratory group studies the biological origins of sexual differences, and in particular the actions of the gonadal steroid hormones androgen and estrogen. Her studies focus on the vocal behaviors of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. Kelley received degrees from Barnard College and Rockefeller University, and she taught and performed research at Princeton University before coming to Columbia.

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Recommended Reading
See the list of recommended Web sites and articles posted in the e-seminar.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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