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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
Brain to Brain: Animal Communication
E-Seminar 1, Scents and Sensibility

Taught by: Darcy B. Kelley

Description
E-Seminar Description
Have you ever wondered how animals of the same species find each other, how they understand one another, or how animal brains make sense of all the noises, smells, and other signals they encounter? Darcy B. Kelley, Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, leads us into the world of the brain to explore how it generates and processes the varied signals used in the fascinating world of animal communication.

In this e–seminar, the first in a series of four, Professor Kelley gives a tour of brain anatomy and shows how nerve cells communicate with each other. She then explores how the fascinating signals of pheromones are used and sensed in the animal kingdom, and whether there is any likelihood that we, too, are lured to one another by odors we can't "smell." Kelley elucidates these concepts using up–to–date research information and state–of–the–art animation, imagery, text, and reading materials.


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E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

Interested in this
e-seminar?
Go to the e-seminar now*.

Note: Columbia students, faculty, staff, and alumni will need to use their University Network ID (UNI) to access e-seminars.



E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading |
Additional Information |Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    Identify major features of brain anatomy.

•    Explain how neurons communicate with each other and how incoming sensory signals are managed by nerve cells.

•    Understand the function and processing of pheromone signals and the odor-processing anatomy.

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Outline
1. Introduction
2. The Brain
3. Animal Signaling
4. Pheromone Detection
5. Human Pheromones?

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Darcy B. Kelley is Professor of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. She is the editor of the Journal of Neurobiology and a codirector of Columbia's doctoral subcommittee on neurobiology and behavior. Her laboratory group studies the biological origins of sexual differences, and in particular the actions of the gonadal steroid hormones androgen and estrogen. Her studies focus on the vocal behaviors of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. Kelley received degrees from Barnard College and Rockefeller University, and she taught and performed research at Princeton University before coming to Columbia.


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Recommended Reading
Ackerman, Diane. A Natural History of the Senses. New York: Vintage, 1991.

Atkins, P. W. Molecules. Scientific American Library Series, no. 21. New York: Scientific American Library, 1987.

Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. Translated by John E. Woods. New York: Vintage International, 2001.

Corbin, Alain. The Foul and the Fragrant: Odor and the French Social Imagination. Translated by Miriam L. Kochan. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1986.

Classen, Constance, David Howes, and Anthony Synnott. Aroma: The Cultural History of Smell. New York: Routledge, 1994.


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Additional Information
Who should take this course? Students of biology and ethology; lifelong learners; animal enthusiasts.

Reading assignments: There are no required reading assignments in this course. Professor Kelley has included article excerpts and Web links within the course, and has recommended books for further study.

Taking the seminar: The content of this e-seminar is delivered entirely on the Internet. You may access this content and participate in discussions at any time during which the course is open. There are no set times in which you must be online.

This course includes a discussion board for students to pose questions and comments to their peers and the professor.


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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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