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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail




E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 2
The Modern Threat of Plastics


A Series of Two E-Seminars
The Politics of Pollution

The Politics of Pollution
E-Seminar 1, Lead Poisoning and the Industrial Age

Taught by: David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz

Description
In the twentieth century, lead, in the form of lead-based paints and leaded gasoline, literally covered Earth. Despite long-standing evidence of lead's crippling, even deadly, health effects, the lead industry actively promoted its product as benign, even beneficial, for consumers. In their two-part series The Politics of Pollution, David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz, professors at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, examine the impact of industrial production on the well-being of workers and consumers alike. They reveal how corporations have sought to avoid both regulation and scandal by concealing negative health effects associated with their products.




Video Preview
Images of home decoration illustrate Professor Rosner's discussion of why the new middle class eagerly adopted lead paint.


In Lead Poisoning in the Industrial Age, the first e-seminar in the series, Professors Rosner and Markowitz focus on the lead industry as emblematic of industrial pollution and industrial disease in the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries. They reconstruct the path of lead pollution in the United States—from public ignorance and child-focused marketing to public outrage and an industry on the defensive. They discuss how decades of public-health outcries finally spurred regulatory action and ultimately resulted in increased public awareness of and activism about the overall impact of industry on society. Finally, Professors Rosner and Markowitz look at the lingering lead burden in the United States and at current efforts by the lead industry to shift its market—and the associated health problems—overseas.

E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

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Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

Outline
1. Introduction
2. Lead in the Industrial Age
3. Leaded Gasoline
4. The Rise of Lead Paint
5. Paint as Poison
6. The Government Steps In
7. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
David Rosner
David Rosner is Professor of History and Public Health at Columbia University and Director of the Center for the History of Public Health at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health. He received his doctorate from Harvard in the history of science and was University Distinguished Professor of History at the City University of New York. In addition to having received numerous grants, he has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and a Josiah Macy Fellow. He has been awarded the Distinguished Scholar's Prize from the City University and the Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of Public Health from the American Public Health Association.

Instructor's Background
Gerald Markowitz
Gerald Markowitz is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of Thematic Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, and Professor of History at the CUNY Graduate Center. He also serves as an Adjunct Professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Professor Markowitz has been awarded numerous grants, including from the National Endowment for the humanities. He is a recipient of the Viseltear Prize, from the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association, for outstanding contributions to the history of public health.

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Recommended Reading
Markowitz, Gerald, and David Rosner. Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution. Berkeley: University of California Press; New York, Milbank Memorial Fund, 2002.

Rosner, David, and Gerald Markowitz. Dying for Work: Workers' Safety and Health in Twentieth-Century America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987.

Sellers, Christopher C. Hazards of the Job: From Industrial Disease to Environmental Health Science. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

Warren, Christian. Brush with Death: A Social History of Lead Poisoning. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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