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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
The Roots of Health Care in the United States


E-Seminar 2
Medicare, Medicaid, and the Legacy of the New Deal


E-Seminar 3
The Uninsured


E-Seminar 4
Managing the Managed-Care Revolution


E-Seminar 5
Managed-Care in the Public Sector


The Politics of Health Care
A Series of Six E-Seminars


 
The Politics of Health Care
E-Seminar 6, Long-Term Care

Taught by: Michael S. Sparer, Ph.D.

Description
Advances in medicine and an aging Baby Boomer population are currently combining to create an increasingly elderly population in the United States. Health-care policymakers, however, have failed to adequately address this ongoing demographic shift. Long-term care was once the purview of individual families. Today, nursing homes, assisted-living facilities, and home-health-care workers provide much of the nation's long-term care at an annual cost of $132 billion. They are funded through an uneasy patchwork of sources, including Medicaid, Medicare, and the savings of individual health-care consumers. In the final e-seminar in his six-part series, The Politics of Health Care, Michael S. Sparer, associate professor of public health at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, investigates the crisis in long-term care in America.



E-Seminar Trailer (RealVideo Clip)
Professor Sparer explains that labor costs, not high-tech medical care, account for the vast majority of nursing-home expenditures.

E-Seminar Length: 3-5 hours
Start Date: Anytime
Credits: Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites: None
Moderator: None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni: FREE

Interested in this
e-seminar?
Go to the e-seminar now*.

Note: Columbia students, faculty, staff, and alumni will need to use their University Network ID (UNI) to access e-seminars.



E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Additional Resources | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•   Learn about the evolution of the long-term-care system in the United States.

•   Understand the funding guidelines currently governing Medicare and Medicaid contributions to long-term care.

•   Review initiatives by policymakers to create a more coherent approach to long-term care, i.e., managed long-term care.

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Outline
1. Introduction
2. Evolution of Long-Term Care
3. Providing Long-Term Care
4. Paying for Long-Term Care
5. The Current Agenda
6. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Michael Sparer is Associate Professor at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Brandeis University and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law (Newark). Professor Sparer studies and writes about the politics of health care with an emphasis on the state and local role in the American health-care system. He is the author of Medicaid and the Limits of State Health Reform (Temple University Press, 1996) as well as numerous articles and book chapters.

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Recommended Reading
Feldman, Penny Hollander, ed. "From Philosophy to Practice: Selected Issues in Financing and Coordinating Long-Term Care." Journal of Aging and Health 15, no. 1 (February 2003).

Kovner, Anthony R. and Steven Jonas, eds. "Long-Term Care." Chap. 8 in Jonas & Kovner's Health Care Delivery in the United States. 7th ed. New York: Springer, 2002.

McCall, Nelda, ed. Who Will Pay for Long Term Care?: Insights from the Partnership Programs. Chicago: Health Administration Press, 2001.

Murtaugh, Christopher M., Michael S. Sparer, Penny Hollander Feldman, Ji Seon Lee, Arielle Basch, Amy Sherlock, and Amy Clark. State Strategies for Allocating Resources to Home and Community-Based Care. Princeton, N.J.: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1999.


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Additional Resources
The Web site of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, an independent philanthropy focusing on the major health care issues facing the nation.

The Web site of the AARP Research Center, the research arm of the AARP, a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing the needs and interests of persons 50 and older.

The Web site of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropic organization focused exclusively on health and health care in the United States.

The Web site of the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan economic and social-policy research organization.


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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128MB or more recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128MB or more recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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