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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 2
Medicare, Medicaid, and the Legacy of the New Deal


E-Seminar 3
The Uninsured


E-Seminar 4
Managing the Managed-Care Revolution


E-Seminar 5
Managed Care in the Public Sector


E-Seminar 6
Long-Term Care


The Politics of Health Care
A Series of Six E-Seminars


 
The Politics of Health Care
E-Seminar 1, The Roots of Health Care in the United States

Taught by: Michael S. Sparer

Description
E-Seminar Description
Although many Americans express concern and often anger about the state of the nation's health-care system, far too few of us understand why and how the system functions. In this six-part e-seminar series, Michael S. Sparer, associate professor of public health at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, demystifies health care in the United States. He explores the following topics
•    how the health-care system is organized,
•    who pays the health-care bill,
•    why efforts to enact national health insurance have failed,
•    what the key issues are on the nation's long-term care policy agenda,
•    what role the government now plays in the U.S. health-care system,
•    how government can encourage good quality care.

In this first e-seminar, Professor Sparer exposes the foundations of health care in the United States. He looks at how America's culture of independence and innate distrust of government inspired the nation's early reliance on market solutions for health-care provision. Beginning with the American Revolution and continuing through World War II, the e-seminar offers a fascinating look at how health care evolved from the birth of the nation to the cusp of the modern era.

E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

Interested in this
e-seminar?
Go to the e-seminar now*.

Note: Columbia students, faculty, staff, and alumni will need to use their University Network ID (UNI) to access e-seminars.



E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•   Gain a basic grounding in the role the United States government plays in the nation's overall health and welfare system.

•   Learn how that role of government role has changed, particularly over the last fifty years.

•   Understand the specific evolution of the health-insurance and health-care system in the United States.

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Outline
1. Introduction
2. A History of Limited Government
      Articles of Confederation
      Constitutional Convention
      Madison and Hamilton: Shaping the National Government
      Jefferson and State Rights
3. Unregulated Care: Midwives, Medicine Men, and Country Docs
      English Poor Law Tradition
      Early Government Health Efforts
      A Host of Healers
      The Rise of Doctors and Hospitals
4. Insuring America's Health
      Hospitals as Insurers
      Birth of the Blues: Blue Cross and Blue Shield
      Government Spurs the Third-Party System
      Arrival of the Commercial Insurers
5. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Michael S. Sparer is an Associate Professor at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Brandeis University and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law (Newark). Professor Sparer studies and writes about the politics of health care with an emphasis on the role of state and local governments in the American health care system. He is the author of Medicaid and the Limits of State Health Reform (Temple University Press, 1996) as well as numerous articles and book chapters.

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Recommended Reading
Starr, Paul. The Social Transformation of American Medicine. New York: Basic, 1982.

Shi, Leiyu, and Douglas Singh. Delivering Health Care in America: A Systems Approach. Gaithersburg, Md.: Aspen, 1998.

Ellis, Joseph. Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation . New York: Knopf, 2000.

Morone, James. The Democratic Wish: Popular Participation and the Limits of American Government. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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