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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
An Adventure with Words: James Joyce's Ulysses
Taught by: Michael Seidel

Description
E-Seminar Description
Joyce is famous for his use of interior monologue (for which the term stream of consciousness was coined), but in Ulysses he uses a variety of narrative modes—third-person, sounded, interior, and fourth-estate narration. Recognizing and identifying the function of each is crucial to understanding this classic novel.

This e-seminar is composed of six parts: an introduction, and five explorations of different narrative modes. Each section not only identifies and defines the mode, but explores how Joyce uses each in specific ways, and provides extensive examples from the novel.

Professor Seidel is a well-known Joyce expert, and this e-seminar provides a unique and invaluable point of access to Joyce's most famous (and, unfortunately, famously difficult) work.

The site also includes a rich reading list for those wishing to take their studies further.

E-Seminar Length:1–2 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

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e-seminar?
Go to the e-seminar now*.

Note: Columbia students, faculty, staff, and alumni will need to use their University Network ID (UNI) to access e-seminars.



Instructor's Background | Technical Requirements

Instructor's Background
Instructor Background
Professor Michael Seidel came to Columbia in 1977, after having taught at Yale for seven years, and is currently chair of Literature Humanities. He specializes in eighteenth-century literature, in narrative theory, in satire, and in James Joyce. His first book was Epic Geography: James Joyce's Ulysses, published in 1976. He has edited Homer to Brecht: The European Epic and Dramatic Traditions, with Edward Mendelson. Other academic books include Satiric Inheritance: Rabelais to Sterne (1979), Exile and the Narrative Imagination (1986), Robinson Crusoe: Island Myths and the Novel (1991), and James Joyce: A Short Introduction (2002). In addition he has written two baseball books, Streak: Joe DiMaggio and the Summer of '41 and Ted Williams: A Baseball Life.

He is associate editor of Columbia History of the British Novel, associate editor of Columbia World of Quotations, and associate editor of The Works of Daniel Defoe. He is the editor of the forthcoming Barnes and Nobel edition of Ulysses. Professor Seidel has served as department chair, as vice chair, and as M.A. director. He is an advisory editor of James Joyce Studies and a member of the National Humanities Board of the World Book Encyclopedia. He has received an NEH grant and served as director of NEH summer seminars for college teachers in 1987 and 1992. He received his B.A. from UCLA in 1966, his M.A. from UCLA in 1967, and his Ph.D. from UCLA in 1970.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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