Lo/56k Hi/300k
HomeSubjectsResourcesE-SeminarsE-CoursesColumbia University
Browse according to your interestsClass websites, webcasts, and more
 
Short courses free to ColumbiaFor-credit coursesColumbia new media initiatives
Columbia InteractiveSite MapSearchHelp
E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
From Idea to Interview: Launching an Oral-History Project


E-Seminar 2
Talk to Text: Completing an Oral-History Project


 
Biography of the AIDS Epidemic: Creating an Oral-History Project
A Series of Two E-Seminars

Taught by: Ronald Bayer and Gerald Oppenheimer

Description
E-Seminar Description
In 1981, the first case of what became known as AIDS was reported by the Centers for Disease Control. In the early years of the AIDS epidemic, the doctors at the front lines witnessed a sudden massacre and struggled to treat against an agent they didn't understand. What impact did this experience have on these doctors, and how did this first group of caregivers shape the evolution of the epidemic?

To construct a collective biography of the early AIDS doctors, Ronald Bayer, Columbia University professor of public health, and Gerald Oppenheimer, associate professor of clinical public health, turned to oral history. After extensive preparation, interviewing, and editing, they published AIDS Doctors: Voices from the Epidemic, an historical account of the epidemic through the eyes of the doctors who experienced it.

In their two e-seminars, Professors Bayer and Oppenheimer take the student on a tour through the planning and execution of an oral-history project. Through anecdotes, constructive advice and tips, collected readings and resources, and sample planning documents, the student will follow the development of the project from inspiration to publication. Upon completing both seminars, the student will have learned the process and potential uses of an oral-history project and will be equipped to embark on an oral-history project of his or her own, or to make skillful use of existing oral histories.

Series Length:6–10 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE
Interested in this
series?
Go to the series now.



E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructors' Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    Become well versed in the issues that need to be addressed before beginning an oral-history project.

•    Become prepared to plan an oral-history project, to conduct interviews, and to address sensitive issues that may arise during and after the interviews.

•    Become equipped to construct a nonarchival project using oral-history materials, and to present and evaluate your project.

back to top

Outline
E-seminar 1
1. Introduction
2. Choosing a Topic
3. Choosing Subjects
4. Preparing
5. Making Contact
6. Funding
7. Forming Questions
8. Arranging Meetings
9. Collaborating

E-seminar 2
1. Introduction
2. In the Interview
3. Sensitive Issues
4. Ending the Interview
5. Preparing to Write
6. Writing Issues
7. Problems and Additions
8. Presenting the Project

back to top

Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Ronald Bayer is Professor of Public Health at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He serves as codirector of the Program in the History of Medicine and Public Health. For the past 18 years his work on the ethics of public health has centered on AIDS, and he has also studied tuberculosis policy and tobacco regulations in liberal democracies.

Gerald Oppenheimer, who earned his M.P.H. from Columbia University, is Associate Professor of Clinical Public Health at the Mailman School of Public Health and a Professor of Public Health at Brooklyn College, City University of New York. His research focuses on epidemiology, AIDS health policy, health-insurance issues, and the history of public health.


back to top

Recommended Reading
Bayer, Ronald, and Gerald M. Oppenheimer. AIDS Doctors: Voices from the Epidemic. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Grele, Ronald J., with Studs Terkel. Envelopes of Sound: The Art of Oral History. 2d ed., rev. and enl. New York: Praeger, 1990.

Portelli, Alessandro. The Death of Luigi Trastulli, and Other Stories: Form and Meaning in Oral History. Albany: State University Press of New York, 1991.

Raines, Howell. My Soul Is Rested: Movement Days in the Deep South Remembered. New York: Penguin, 1983.

Terkel, Studs. Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. New York: Pantheon, 1974.

back to top

Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

back to top

Help   |   Privacy Policy