Lo/56k Hi/300k
HomeSubjectsResourcesE-SeminarsE-CoursesColumbia University
Browse according to your interestsClass websites, webcasts, and more
 
Short courses free to ColumbiaFor-credit coursesColumbia new media initiatives
Columbia InteractiveSite MapSearchHelp
E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
The Origins of Slavery in the New World


E-Seminar 2
The Struggle for Freedom


E-Seminar 3
The Old South


E-Seminar 4
Abolitionism and Antislavery


E-Seminar 5
The Civil War


E-Seminar 6
The Meaning of Freedom


E-Seminar 7
Radical Reconstruction


E-Seminar 8
Retreat from Reconstruction


 
Slavery and Emancipation
A Series of Eight E-Seminars

Taught by: Eric Foner

Description
E-Seminar Description
In his eight-part series Slavery and Emancipation, Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, explores a subject that is essential to understanding the history of the United States and the evolution of our concept of freedom.

Professor Foner begins by exploring the centrality of slavery to the development of the American colonies. He then examines the American Revolution, describing the struggle for freedom waged concurrently by colonists against the British Empire and by blacks against slavery. In subsequent lectures he describes how in the nineteenth century slavery entrenched itself in the Southern states and expanded westward, becoming both the most powerful and the most contested institution in the United States. Professor Foner discusses slave life and slave resistance, abolitionism and the antislavery movement, and how the Civil War brought about the end of slavery. In his final lectures he deals with the aftermath of emancipation: the conflict between Southern whites and blacks over the meaning of freedom for former slaves, the crucial amendments made to our Constitution in an attempt to define and protect that freedom, the achievements of the brief Reconstruction period and its violent overthrow. Professor Foner shows how, throughout our history, slavery and racial inequality have challenged the vision of America as a land of equality and freedom and underscored how fragile that freedom can be.

Series Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE
Interested in this
series?
Go to the series now.



Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

Outline
E-Seminar 1: The Origins of Slavery in the New World
  1. Introduction
  2. Slavery in World History
  3. The Triangular Trades
  4. Slavery in the Americas
  5. Laws and Statutes
  6. Slavery and Empire
  7. Systems of Slavery
  8. African American Cultures
  9. Slave Resistance
  10. The Dream of Freedom

E-Seminar 2: The Struggle for Freedom
  1. Introduction
  2. Meanings of Freedom
  3. The American Revolution
  4. The Constitution
  5. The Turning Point
  6. American Nationhood
  7. Conclusion

E-Seminar 3: The Old South
  1. Introduction
  2. The Rise of the Cotton Kingdom
  3. Plantation Values
  4. Slave Life and Culture
  5. Resistance to Slavery
  6. Conclusion

E-Seminar 4: Abolitionism and Antislavery
  1. Introduction
  2. The Rise of Abolition
  3. The Abolitionist Outlook
  4. The Expansion Issue
  5. The Road to War
  6. Conclusion

E-Seminar 5: The Civil War
  1. Introduction
  2. Features of the Civil War
  3. The Road to Emancipation
  4. The Emancipation Proclamation
  5. Black Soldiers
  6. The End of Slavery
  7. Conclusion

E-Seminar 6: The Meaning of Freedom
  1. Introduction
  2. Black Aspirations
  3. Planters' Views
  4. Northern Hopes
  5. Before War's End
  6. Presidential Reconstruction
  7. The 39th Congress
  8. Conclusion

E-Seminar 7: Radical Reconstruction
  1. Introduction
  2. The Rise of Black Politics
  3. White Republicans
  4. Achievements and Failures
  5. Conclusion

E-Seminar 8: Retreat from Reconstruction
  1. Introduction
  2. The Ku Klux Klan
  3. The Waning of Northern Commitment
  4. The Post-Reconstruction South
  5. Legacies
  6. Conclusion


back to top

Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, received his Ph.D. in American history at Columbia under the supervision of Richard Hofstadter. He has taught as a visiting professor at Cambridge University, as Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions; at Moscow State University as Fulbright Lecturer in American History; and at Oxford University as Harmsworth Professor of American History.

Professor Foner's publications have concentrated on the intersections of intellectual, political, and social history and the history of American race relations. Among his books are Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War (1970, 1971, 1995); Tom Paine and Revolutionary America (1976); Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War (1980); Nothing but Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy (1983), and Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877 (1988, 2002), winner of the Bancroft Prize, Parkman Prize, Avery O. Craven Prize, Owsley Award, Lionel Trilling Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. He edited The New American History (1990, 1997) for the American Historical Association and, with John A. Garraty, The Reader's Companion to American History (1991). His most recent books are The Story of American Freedom (1998) and Who Owns History: Rethinking the Past in a Changing World (2002), a collection of his essays. Professor Foner is curator of A House Divided: America in the Age of Lincoln, a historical exhibition that opened at the Chicago Historical Society in 1990, and of America's Reconstruction: People and Politics after the Civil War, a traveling exhibit first shown at the Virginia Historical Society in 1996. A winner of the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates, Professor Foner is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the British Academy. He served in 1993–94 as president of the Organization of American Historians, and in 2000 as president of the American Historical Association.

back to top

Recommended Reading
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1998.

Davis, David B. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770–1823. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Foner, Eric. Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877. New York: Harper and Row, 1988.

Foner, Eric. Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Genovese, Eugene D. Roll, Jordon, Roll: The World the Slaves Made. New York: Pantheon, 1974.

Gillette, William.
Retreat from Reconstruction, 1869–1879. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979.

Holt, Thomas. Black over White: Negro Political Leadership in South Carolina During Reconstruction. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1977.

Kolchin, Peter. American Slavery, 1619–1877. New York: Hill and Wang, 1993.

Litwack, Leon F. Been in the Storm So Long: The Aftermath of Slavery. New York: Vintage Books, 1979.

McPherson, James. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Potter, David M. The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861. New York: Harper and Row, 1976.

Rable, George C. But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1984.

Stewart, James Brewer. Holy Warriors: The Abolitionists and American Slavery. Rev. ed. New York: Hill and Wang, 1997.

Wood, Betty. The Origins of American Slavery: Freedom and Bondage in the English Colonies. New York: Hill and Wang, 1997.


back to top

Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

back to top

Help   |   Privacy Policy