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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
The Origins of Slavery in the New World


E-Seminar 2
The Struggle for Freedom


E-Seminar 3
The Old South


E-Seminar 4
Abolitionism and Antislavery


E-Seminar 5
The Civil War


E-Seminar 6
The Meaning of Freedom


E-Seminar 7
Radical Reconstruction


Slavery and Emancipation
A Series of Eight E-Seminars


 
Slavery and Emancipation
E-Seminar 8, Retreat from Reconstruction

Taught by: Eric Foner

Description
E-Seminar Description
By the early 1870s, violence by the Ku Klux Klan and other groups of Southern whites was weakening the Republican state governments that had come to power in the South. The civil rights conferred on former slaves by the 14th and 15th Amendments were preserved only through federal intervention, and Northern commitment to the provision of such protection soon waned. In this eighth and final e-seminar of the series Slavery and Emancipation, Professor Eric Foner traces the developments that brought Reconstruction to an end and discusses what that ending meant for Southern blacks and for the nation. By 1900, a new racial order had been imposed in the South, resting on segregation, disenfranchisement, and the economic subordination of blacks. But the ideals of Reconstruction remained embedded in the Constitution, and eventually, in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, another generation would strive for the equal citizenship and interracial democracy that were first attempted in the period following the Civil War. The e-seminar presents streaming video of Professor Foner's lecture and combines it with text, images, a who's who, a timeline, primary documents, and a discussion board.

E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

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Note: Columbia students, faculty, staff, and alumni will need to use their University Network ID (UNI) to access e-seminars.



E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    Learn about the Ku Klux Klan and other violent groups in the Reconstruction South.

•    Learn about the North's retreat from its commitment to protecting the rights of the former slaves.

•    Understand the impact of the "Bargain of 1877" on Southern and national politics.

•    Understand the consequences of the ending of Reconstruction, for the South and for the nation.


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Outline
1. Introduction
2. The Ku Klux Klan
3. The Waning of Northern Commitment
4. The Post-Reconstruction South
5. Legacies
6. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Eric Foner, Professor of History at Columbia University, is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the British Academy. He has served as President of the Organization of American Historians and the American Historical Association. His books include Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War; Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War; Nothing but Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy; Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877; The Story of American Freedom, and Who Owns History: Rethinking the Past in a Changing World.

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Recommended Reading
Foner, Eric. Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877. New York: Harper and Row, 1988.

Gillette, William. Retreat from Reconstruction, 1869–1879. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979.

Rable, George C. But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1984.

Richardson, Heather Cox. The Death of Reconstruction: Race, Labor, and Politics in the Post–Civil War North, 1865–1901. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Trelease, Allen W. White Terror: The Ku Klux Klan Conspiracy and Southern Reconstruction . New York: Harper and Row, 1971.

Woodward, C. Vann. Origins of the New South, 1877–1913. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1971.


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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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