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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
The Origins of Slavery in the New World


E-Seminar 2
The Struggle for Freedom


E-Seminar 3
The Old South


E-Seminar 4
Abolitionism and Antislavery


E-Seminar 6
The Meaning of Freedom


E-Seminar 7
Radical Reconstruction


E-Seminar 8
Retreat from Reconstruction


Slavery and Emancipation
A Series of Eight E-Seminars


 
Slavery and Emancipation
E-Seminar 5, The Civil War

Taught by: Eric Foner

Description
E-Seminar Description
The Civil War began as a struggle to preserve the Union, not to abolish slavery. In this e-seminar, the fifth in the series Slavery and Emancipation, Professor Eric Foner explores the combination of factors—military stalemate, pressure from abolitionists and Radical Republicans, and the actions of slaves who fled plantations as the Union army entered the South—that propelled the Lincoln administration down the road to emancipation. Foner also describes how the service of 200,000 black men in the Union army and navy contributed to the war's outcome and raised the question of black citizenship, so that by the end of the war the rights and status of former slaves had moved to the forefront of the nation's consciousness. The e-seminar combines streaming video of Foner's lecture with text, images, audio slide shows, interactive maps, primary documents, and a discussion board.

E-Seminar Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE

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E-Seminar Objectives | Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

E-Seminar Objectives
•    Learn what developments during the first two years of the Civil War helped to inspire President Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

•    Understand the limitations of the Emancipation Proclamation and how the document affected the course of the war from 1863 onward.

•    Explore how the service of black soldiers affected the course of the war and the debate over black citizenship.

•    Learn how President Lincoln's views on slavery and race evolved during the course of the Civil War.


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Outline
1. Introduction
2. Features of the Civil War
3. The Road to Emancipation
4. The Emancipation Proclamation
5. Black Soldiers
6. The End of Slavery
7. Conclusion

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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, received his Ph.D. in American history at Columbia under the supervision of Richard Hofstadter. His publications have concentrated on the intersections of intellectual, political, and social history and the history of American race relations. Among his books are Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War (1970, 1971, 1995); Tom Paine and Revolutionary America (1976); Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War (1980); Nothing but Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy (1983), and Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877 (1988, 2002), winner of the Bancroft Prize, Parkman Prize, Avery O. Craven Prize, Owsley Award, Lionel Trilling Prize, and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. With John A. Garraty, he edited The Reader's Companion to American History (1991). His most recent books are The Story of American Freedom (1998) and Who Owns History: Rethinking the Past in a Changing World (2002), a collection of his recent essays.

A winner of the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates, Professor Foner is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the British Academy. He served in 1993-94 as President of the Organization of American Historians, and in 2000 as President of the American Historical Association. He has directed summer seminars for college and high school teachers sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Gilder-Lehrman Institute, and is the editor of The New American History (1990, 1997), a collection of essays sponsored by the American Historical Association and designed to acquaint high-school teachers with the latest trends in historical scholarship on the American past.

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Recommended Reading
Berlin, Ira, and others. Slaves No More: Three Essays on Emancipation and the Civil War. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Donald, David Herbert. Lincoln. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1995.

Franklin, John Hope. The Emancipation Proclamation. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963. Reprint, Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Books, 1965.

McPherson, James. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Quarles, Benjamin. Lincoln and the Negro. New York: Oxford University Press, 1962. Reprint, New York, N.Y.: Da Capo Press, 1991.

Thomas, Emory M. The Confederate Nation, 1861–1865. New York: Harper and Row, 1979.

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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
64 MB of RAM (128 recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

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