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E-Seminars: E-Seminar Detail
 



E-Seminars in This Series

E-Seminar 1
History as Destiny: The Case of New York City


E-Seminar 2
Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground


E-Seminar 3
Urban Crisis: Fire and Water


E-Seminar 4
Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space


E-Seminar 5
Ethnic New York


E-Seminar 6
Urban Crisis: Fire and Water


E-Seminar 7
Bosses of All Kinds


E-Seminar 8
The Reinvention of New York


 
The History of the City of New York
A Series of Eight E-Seminars

Taught by: Kenneth T. Jackson

Description
E-Seminar Description
In The History of the City of New York, a series of eight e-seminars, Kenneth T. Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor of History and the Social Sciences at Columbia, has adapted his legendary semester-length course for the Internet. In reviewing the city's history from the arrival of the Dutch to the present, he stresses New York's great flexibility and openness to change and provides numerous examples—measures to prevent disease, for example, and the recognition of the need for parks and open spaces—to illustrate his observation that many features of modern urban life have their origins in New York and from there were disseminated to other cities in the United States and around the world.

Professor Jackson begins by comparing New York to other cities, establishing why and in what respects New York is unique. The series then proceeds chronologically. Professor Jackson examines the settlement by the Dutch, the dominance of commerce in New York's culture, the forgotten role of New York in the American Revolution, and the construction of the Erie canal in 1825, one of the most critical milestones in the city's growth and development. In the third and fourth e-seminars, he looks at how the burgeoning metropolis in the nineteenth century responded to problems of urban crowding; his topics include the creation of Central Park, the formation of professional police and fire departments to maintain order, and the development of a code of public health. In the fifth e-seminar, Professor Jackson describes some of the social and cultural institutions and common elements of urban infrastructure that were either incubated or developed in New York in the late nineteenth century—department stores, for example, and the complex system of rapid transit that made it feasible for people to live far from their jobs. In the sixth e-seminar, he considers immigration and the changing ethnic composition of some of the city's most famous neighborhoods. The seventh e-seminar is devoted to the city's colorful cast of politicians (not all of them publicly elected), whose flair for organization at the local, grassroots level has often gone unrecognized but was of considerable help to many of the city's residents looking to meet their basic needs. In the final e-seminar, Professor Jackson looks at New York's port and industries, noting the decline of manufacturing in New York and the subsequent rise of the service industries, and then offers a thoughtful assessment of historic preservation, weighing its advantages and disadvantages and suggesting that the project of preserving the city's many architectural landmarks be balanced against the need for economic growth and future development.

Each e-seminar is a rich multimedia presentation including archival images, audio slide shows, a transcript of the lecture, and video of Professor Jackson's memorable and entertaining lecture.

Series Length:3-5 hours
Start Date:Anytime
Credits:Not-for-Credit
Prerequisites:None
Moderator:None
Columbia Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni:FREE
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Outline | Instructor's Background | Recommended Reading | Technical Requirements

Outline

E-Seminar 1: History as Destiny: The Case of New York City
  1. American Cities—New York in Context
  2. New York Is—and Was— Different
  3. Present-Day Characteristics of New York
  4. New York City's Past Informs Its Future
  5. The Placement of Cities
  6. American Cities: Cultural Inheritances
  7. Epilogue

E-Seminar 2: Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground
  1. Dutch New York
  2. British New York
  3. Prelude to War
  4. The Fight for New York
  5. The Post-Revolutionary City
  6. New York and the Civil War

E-Seminar 3: Urban Crisis: Fire and Water
  1. New York City Grows
  2. Fire
  3. Disasters
  4. Water
  5. Cities Deal with Water
  6. Wealth in Water

E-Seminar 4: Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space
  1. Parks
  2. Central Park
  3. Public Health
  4. Crime and Public Order
  5. The Draft Riots

E-Seminar 5: City People
  1. Living
  2. Newspapers
  3. Department Stores and Restaurants
  4. Recreation: Sports
  5. Recreation: Coney Island
  6. Transportation: First Solutions
  7. Transportation: Subways
  8. Conclusion

E-Seminar 6: Ethnic New York
  1. A City of Neighborhoods
  2. Harlem
  3. The Lower East Side
  4. The Housing Crisis
  5. Tenement Law

E-Seminar 7: Bosses of All Kinds
  1. Tammany Hall
  2. The Machine
  3. Later Bosses
  4. Sullivan
  5. Final Years
  6. Robert Moses

E-Seminar 8: The Reinvention of New York
  1. Industrial Decline
  2. Gotham's Enterprises
  3. Problems
  4. The Port
  5. Port Authority
  6. Is History for Losers?


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Instructor's Background
Instructor's Background
Kenneth T. Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor of History and the Social Sciences at Columbia University, where he has taught for more than three decades. The president of the New-York Historical Society, Professor Jackson is the editor of The Encyclopedia of New York City (1995) and the author of numerous books. In 1993 Playboy magazine named him one of the most popular professors in the United States, and in 1999 he was the recipient of the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. The New York Council for the Humanities named him Scholar of the Year in 2001.

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Recommended Reading
Gunther, Paul Barth. City People: The Rise of Modern City Culture in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Caro, Robert A. The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York. New York: Knopf, 1974.

Jackson, Kenneth T. Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Jackson, Kenneth T., ed The Encyclopedia of New York City. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.

Jackson, Kenneth T., ed. The Great Metropolis: Poverty and Progress in New York City. New York: American Heritage Custom Publishing, 1994.

Rosenzweig, Roy, and Elizabeth Blackmar. The Park and the People: A History of Central Park. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1992.



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Technical Requirements
You will need to use a computer with Internet access to complete this course. We recommend the following minimum configurations:

IBM-COMPATIBLE PC
Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, or NT
128 MB of RAM (256 MB or more recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 4 or above (Internet Explorer 5 strongly recommended) or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)

MACINTOSH
MAC OS 8.6 or higher
128 MB of RAM (256 MB or more recommended)
Monitor: 800x600 resolution recommended
Connection: Internet service and 56K modem minimum
Browser: Internet Explorer 5 or above or Netscape 4.7 or above
Sound Card (if you can hear audio you have a sound card)
Plug-ins: RealPlayer 7 or later; Flash Player 5 or later; Acrobat Reader 5 or later
(all plug-ins are free)


*Note: This series is optimized for high bandwidth connections.

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